Ai
Art
Beauty
Biotech
Business
City
Clothing
Communication
Construction
Education
Energy
Entertainment
Family
Food
Gadgets
Government
Home
Human
Love
Medicine
Nature
Privacy
Production
Robots
Society
Space
Sport
Threats
Transport
Work

Economic production

"Everything at our plant is automated now. When a client needs a product, they place an order with us through an app. Once our system receives the order, it's processed and transferred to the plant, where the exact number of articles requested in the order are made. The finished and tested products are sent to the client's home using delivery drones (UAVs). Human input is minimal.

I don't know how we used to manage ten years ago. We manufactured goods in such large quantities that we weren't able to sell them later. We constantly had to have sales. And even after that, many products just had to be disposed of. Or else we had the opposite scenario, where we didn't produce enough and had shortages. And the price increased as a result.

Why did this happen? It was inevitable because halting production would have led to a backlash from workers. We'd have had to downsize our staff or hire casual employees to complete an order. As you can imagine, that wouldn't have worked. That's why we tried to anticipate the demand and use this estimate to calculate how many people we needed to hire or let go.

It's easier now. Everything is done by robots. We don't need people. That's a massive saving. There's no lighting or heating expenses. There's no need to cover workers' health insurance. And the site area is a quarter of what it used to be. There used to be 2,497 people working at our plant, now there's just ten. Five of them maintain the machinery, there's three programmers and two cleaners. It sounds funny, but it's people who are doing the cleaning up after robots now."

Anatoly Kovalev, Production Manager at the Smart-Glass Plant. Kazan, 2040.

I agree
13
I don't agree
0