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Singletons, do we need a partner today?

Being alone is no longer the taboo it once was. As old stereotypes about needing a partner or being married lose relevance, people are increasingly choosing for themselves whether to be single or not. 

In 2021 more than 37.5 million American adults live alone. In Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland – countries with some of the highest living standards – about 40% of households consist of just one person. By the year 2030 this percentage will have increased by 50% or more, depending on the country. The numbers show that millions of people around the world are living single lives devoid of long-term or serious romantic relationships. Such people are called "singletons".  Collectivism, including family life, is, for the most part, a relic of the past. Instead, these people live for the sake of self-development, and their lifestyle is progressive. 

Love becomes more about attitude than feeling. Every interaction has its own level of intensity, even virtual communication. If a conversation feels good – even in an exchange with chatbots – “happy hormones”, such as serotonin and dopamine, form in the brain. These hormones, which allow us to feel love, are produced not only when we meet in person. From a psychological point of view, we feel that love for robots and avatars is no longer a futuristic fantasy. This could lead us to differentiate the role of singletons much more in the future, as they are able to satisfy their longing for commitment through technology. Completely new forms of relationships are emerging, and we will increasingly find that these too are beneficial. That they feel real. 
 

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