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Viruses, damaging DNA information

DNA has proven to be a surprisingly convenient means for information storing: it allows you to achieve such data density that magnetic or silicon carriers cannot provide. So data storage systems based on DNA are widely used as devices for a cold backup.

However, they are susceptible to viruses – ordinary ones, including those influencing humans. For example, influenza virus can easily damage the storage inserting itself instead of part of the data. An attacker who wants to cause a failure in the working process of a competing company, can simply infect its employees who are in the data center with influenza or chickenpox.

I agree
212
I don't agree
56
Darko Dimitrijevic A couple thousand times more data will be stored in crystals... 08 Nov 2019
Dragoljub Gajić It is about 30% chance for that prediction. 06 Feb 2019
Liam Scaife This can be backed up by the research being done by scientists today, Some of Martin Luther King's 'I have a dream' speech has already been stored on DNA 06 Feb 2019
Bogdan Roscaneanu What if you seal the storage device using antiviral materials enhanced by antiviral substances? I say you can prevent an infection 06 Feb 2019
Kai_West There are mechanisms to prevent data-archives from being changed implemented today. Checksums for example. One would use these mechanisms in DNA Storage as well. So, Viduses can damage the storage, but that would be like dying cells in flash memory or transmission errors.... 06 Feb 2019
Devin McLaughlin This is already starting to become reality. But I think we should be safe from those viruses though. 06 Feb 2019
Anthony Raymond Asp i would agree with the suggestion that we will be able to store data on dna by this time. but i suggest it wont be a pragmatic priority. to develop a consumer biologic hard driveI think the data density for most electronic storage will remain sufficient but only for svalbards seed vault type projects. (like storing the entire internet for future generations. 06 Feb 2019
Valentin Wesely Viruses wont be the main consern to a fragile chemical structure like DNA. This storage type would have to be handled very careful in any regard but I see that there will be aplication where the high information density will outway the flaws, if there is a way to archive high reading speeds withoit destroying the sequence. 06 Feb 2019