Ai
Beauty
Biotech
Business
City
Clothing
Communication
Construction
Education
Energy
Entertainment
Family
Food
Gadgets
Government
Home
Human
Medicine
Nature
Privacy
Robots
Society
Space
Sport
Threats
Transport
Work

Desalinating jellyfish

By 2050, Dubai has learned to turn an age-old problem to its advantage - the abundance of jellyfish in the sea.

The development of biotechnologies has made it possible to augment a jellyfish’s DNA with the genes of a mangrove tree. The resulting organism is capable of turning seawater into fresh water, cleaning it at the same time. Desalinating bio-farms, now all over the coast, grow this new kind of jellyfish on an industrial scale. This way, the problem that led to large-scale beach closures in early XXI has now become a great benefit.

I agree
30
I don't agree
6
Christopher Sweezey While I do agree with the basic idea, using jellyfish doesn't sound quite right. We would probably use bacteria or protists, not jellyfish. 07 Jun 2019
DJ DRAGON Where would the water go in/out? The jellyfish would still be to abundant and sting and maybe kill people still. Why would the jellyfish want to filter water for us? Also you could do the same thing, except better with a worm: earthworms filter dirt - they put dirty dirt in them and then fertile soil comes out of their anus. If you want to filter water, combine the DNA of earthworms with mangroves, so that the dirt gets replaced with water. Jellyfish wouldn't want to filter water for you. 06 Feb 2019
Will Longaphie So all the fish will be gone by 2050 except for jellyfish??? 06 Feb 2019